Esther de Leeuw at LEL Research Seminar

Posted on March 20, 2017 by



Tomorrow (Tuesday, March 21),  we welcome Esther de Leeuw to the LEL Research Seminar. Esther de Leeuw is a senior lecturer in linguistics currently based at Queen Mary University of London. Here is the abstract:


Plasticity of native language phonetic and phonological domains and enhanced executive control in bilinguals

Esther de Leeuw (Queen Mary)

In this presentation, I will discuss a series of recent studies showing that there is plasticity in native language phonetic and phonological domains post adolescence. Various native languages will be presented, including Albanian (de Leeuw, Tusha, & Schmid, 2017), German (de Leeuw, Mennen, & Scobbie, 2012, 2013; de Leeuw, Schmid, & Mennen, 2010), and Sylheti (McCarthy & de Leeuw, in preparation). The findings from both simultaneous (Sundara, Polka, & Baum, 2006) and late consecutive bilinguals (see de Leeuw, in review) reveal that bidirectional interaction occurs in the languages of the bilingual, even when a new language is learned late in life. The results from these studies challenge a critical period interpretation of language development in the context of bilingualism (see de Leeuw, in review). Instead, the results lend support to the idea that bilinguals, through the very act of being bilingual, undergo an increased cognitive load, leading to bidirectional interaction in their languages, with the potential outcome being enhanced executive control in bilinguals over monolinguals (Bialystok, 2009; de Leeuw, 2014). In addition to the studies examining bidirectional interaction in simultaneous and late consecutive bilinguals, I will also present new research which shows that bilinguals who use their second language more frequently are more likely to evidence enhanced executive control over bilinguals who use their second language less frequently (de Leeuw & Bogulski, 2016). In sum, I will propose that bidirectional interaction in phonetic and phonological domains in the context of bilingualism is an effect of enhanced executive control in bilinguals over monolinguals.


Please join us for the talk! As usual, everyone is invited to stick around afterwards to talk to our speaker over some wine and crisps.

Event details:

Location: Ellen Wilkinson Building, room A2.6

Date and time: Tuesday, March 21, 4.15pm-5.30pm

Advertisements
Posted in: Uncategorized